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Respawn Vienna, come on over and have a beer!

In Articles, News by caro vosLeave a Comment

Respawn, Vienna, come on over and have a beer!

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I took Respawn by surprise, arriving 2 days earlier because the Black King Bar in Bratislava had not opened yet and it’s only an hour drive between the bars. Having given no notice in advance (bit rude, but it was just too hot to be polite), I crashed the place. The doors were open, however, the bar wasn’t, Patrick (owner) was in a meeting but none of it mattered, he welcomed me with open arms. Not because it’s Austrian politeness, but because he’s simply a nice guy!

Respawn is the only esportsbar in the whole of Austria. This because of the very ridiculous law that says you have to pay taxes for each computer there is in an establishment. The amount per computer is 1000 euro a day. What? Why? The Austrian government sees computers as an opportunity to gamble, thus the same law applies. Right. To make it more interesting, Austria is divided into 9 bundeslander, each with their own law. Vienna’s law has only changed into normal (computerwise) this year. Most of the other bundeslander (except Stiermarken where the city of Graz is at) still have the ridiculous law. As soon as the law changed in Vienna, Patrick opened the bar. He’s the first and only so far and would like to open one in Graz as well (Graz has a great esports community).

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This law has consequences for the gaming community in Austria. Not many lans are organized and no international big tournaments organizations even think of coming to Austria because of the 1000 euro/computer/day and that’s a shame, because the Austrian esports community is alive and kicking.

Patrick started the bar because, surprise, he loves esports. However, contrary to the other owners, he’s more of an esports viewer than a player. As he puts it himself, he’s a pro viewer. What he loves doing is watch a game with some friends and some beers. He used to do that in France where he went as an exchange student (bio technology and please notice, again a university degree at work here), got back to Vienna and was unable to do so, which is why, as soon as the law passed, he just opened his own bar.

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there’s 1 missing Patrick!

He wanted to make a home for the gaming community and has succeeded. He says his bar does some small stuff like community events and parties, but is most of all a bar where you can come and play or watch a game, meet your friends and have a beer, just the way he likes it. It counts 8 pc’s in the downstairs and PlayStations in the upstairs. There’s also room for you to bring your laptop and sit down and relax either inside or outside on the lounge terrace and enjoy some food or drinks while you’re at it. It’s all very relaxed, people come and go and customers organize their own little tournaments as well among each other. The key to this bar is; enjoy! How you want to do that is up to you.

Even though at his bar he doesn’t organize big tournaments, he would really like to start an international esportsbar competition (HA! just what I’m doing, but only on a professional level😊 (so not my level)). If you think this is a great idea (which it is!), get in touch with Respawn Vienna, Patrick https://www.facebook.com/Respawn-814763005313539/

Just as I had turned off my recorder, Patrick mentioned something interesting. He read somewhere that esports has become part of the economy and is also doing things the other way around. Normally a new sport/activity starts on a small, local scale, becomes popular and develops into something big worldwide. Sponsorships develop from a local scale into a world wide scale.

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In esports, economy wise, it started big (for the outside world) and that big blast of esports hitting the world has its effect on smaller communities. The economy is now fully realizing there’re big tournaments with a huge amount of viewers watching pro athletes happening. This realization makes traditional business life want to be a part of esports. Because of that, they get involved on a local scale. So it’s not money making esports grow bigger into a worldwide phenomenon. Esports is already there and it’s only by its huge popularity that money wants to get involved.

For the interview with Patrick, go here: upload on tuesday 18 july

For the signing of the flag and presentation of the gift to 404 Milan, go here: upload on tuesday 18 july